thisislez

to learn you must love discipline
carolrossettidesign:

Jessica has always been skinny, and used to get upset when she heard people saying “real men love curves”. Jessica, your body is not there for “real men to love”. You don’t have to do anything to please anyone but yourself.

carolrossettidesign:

Jessica has always been skinny, and used to get upset when she heard people saying “real men love curves”. Jessica, your body is not there for “real men to love”. You don’t have to do anything to please anyone but yourself.

newsweek:

The state of women in technology: 15 data points you should know - TechRepublic

Here are 15 important data points you should know, including a few rays of sunlight.

1. Women made up 26% of the computing workforce in 2013
That’s according to the National Center for Women & Information Technology’s most recent statistics. They also broke down the numbers even more:

3% of computing workforce were black women
5% were Asian women
2% were Hispanic women
2. Professional women earn 73 cents to the dollar vs. men
According to Narrow the Gapp, that’s $333 of a weekly paycheck, which adds up to $17,316 per year. The site also says that women who work in computer and mathematical occupations make 84 cents to every dollar a man earns. That’s $214 out of her weekly paycheck. Compare that to the overall national average of women earning 80 cents to every dollar a man earns.

3. In the mid-1980s, 37% of computer science majors were women; in 2012, 18%
In a study Google released last month, the company surveyed about 1,600 men and women. It showed that girls aren’t really taught what computer science actually means, and are half as likely to be encouraged to study it. The words females unassociated with computer science used to describe it were “boring,” “technology,” and “difficult.”

4. 57% of bachelor’s degrees earned by women, 12% of computer science degrees
Much of this has to do with exposure to computer science before college and during college. According to Code.org, nine out of ten schools don’t even offer computer science classes, and in 28 out of 50 states, computer science doesn’t count towards a math or science credit.

5. Google’s workforce is only 30% female
The company released this information back in May, along with its leadership stats: 79% male. And this isn’t just a Google problem — the same goes for Yahoo, who employs 37% women, Facebook, which is 31%, and LinkedIn, which employs 39%.

But, Google has since made strides to tackle the issue. It announced it will invest $50 million in programs to get girls more interested in STEM education and coding with a “Made With Code” campaign. Some of the money will go to Girls Who Code and Black Girls Code, The company is also working with Girl Scouts of America and female celebrities to spark girls’ interests in computer science.

newsweek:

The state of women in technology: 15 data points you should know - TechRepublic

Here are 15 important data points you should know, including a few rays of sunlight.

1. Women made up 26% of the computing workforce in 2013
That’s according to the National Center for Women & Information Technology’s most recent statistics. They also broke down the numbers even more:

3% of computing workforce were black women
5% were Asian women
2% were Hispanic women
2. Professional women earn 73 cents to the dollar vs. men
According to Narrow the Gapp, that’s $333 of a weekly paycheck, which adds up to $17,316 per year. The site also says that women who work in computer and mathematical occupations make 84 cents to every dollar a man earns. That’s $214 out of her weekly paycheck. Compare that to the overall national average of women earning 80 cents to every dollar a man earns.

3. In the mid-1980s, 37% of computer science majors were women; in 2012, 18%
In a study Google released last month, the company surveyed about 1,600 men and women. It showed that girls aren’t really taught what computer science actually means, and are half as likely to be encouraged to study it. The words females unassociated with computer science used to describe it were “boring,” “technology,” and “difficult.”

4. 57% of bachelor’s degrees earned by women, 12% of computer science degrees
Much of this has to do with exposure to computer science before college and during college. According to Code.org, nine out of ten schools don’t even offer computer science classes, and in 28 out of 50 states, computer science doesn’t count towards a math or science credit.

5. Google’s workforce is only 30% female
The company released this information back in May, along with its leadership stats: 79% male. And this isn’t just a Google problem — the same goes for Yahoo, who employs 37% women, Facebook, which is 31%, and LinkedIn, which employs 39%.

But, Google has since made strides to tackle the issue. It announced it will invest $50 million in programs to get girls more interested in STEM education and coding with a “Made With Code” campaign. Some of the money will go to Girls Who Code and Black Girls Code, The company is also working with Girl Scouts of America and female celebrities to spark girls’ interests in computer science.

stacybarthe:

Smile … Even when you don’t feel like it…

stacybarthe:

Smile … Even when you don’t feel like it…